New MacDonald's Farm

New McDonald's Farm is an Australian children's television program broadcast on the Nine Network and Playhouse Disney, with episodes being produced from 2004 until at least 2008. This show and Australian hit Hi-5 used to swap the timeslot in order to film new seasons. The show revolves around a farm in the country owned by Milly and Max and occupied by six farm animals: Henry the Horse, Daisy the cow, Dash the Duck, Percy the Pig, Shirley the Sheep, and Charlotte the Hen. The show is aimed at pre-schoolers, and is of a light-hearted nature. It includes short sequences related to the show's plot, and sequences of singing and dancing with Max, Milly and some other children. Max is a forgetful, funny and energetic farm worker, who often gets his foot stuck in a bucket. Milly, on the other hand, is an intelligent, helpful and caring farmhand, who often helps Max out of his sticky situations. Each episode is half an hour long. The name of the show suggests that it was inspired by the classic children's song Old McDonald Had a Farm. Which is quite suitable, as it is not exactly what you would call an olden day farm, but the exact opposite, except for the good old windmill.

Jimmy MacDonald's Canada

Jimmy MacDonald's Canada: The Lost Episodes is an eight-episode Canadian television series that aired on CBC Television in the summer of 2005. The show is a mockumentary, purporting to be a lost Canadian public affairs series of the mid-1960s, hosted by the fictional Jimmy MacDonald with additional commentary by Marg Margison. The premise of the show is that Jimmy MacDonald's Canada was a wildly popular TV show in the 1960s, but that MacDonald had a breakdown while on the air and fled to northern Canada, taking all of the filmed episodes with him. His plane crashed and he was presumed dead, and the premise is these films have recently been found. The humour of the show is derived from the differences in social values between the 1960s and today. This humour also extends to now-taboo, then-common cigarette advertisements being included in the show, and even the opening credits, which lampoon the similar style of manic, partially animated credits that were common in the era. Incorporating scripted retrospective commentary from actual public figures, the series never breaks character. In his series, ultra-conservative MacDonald rails against various innovations and the rise of youth culture. Although fictional in nature, the series incorporates actual news and human interest footage from the CBC archives.